Extreme Cards and Papercrafting: Carolina Snowflake

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Jan 5, 2010

Carolina Snowflake

carolina snowflake

My mother makes these woven Carolina snowflakes, also known as Finnish stars or Finnish snowflakes, from thin strips of wood. I, of course, had to try a paper version.

The design is by Billie Ruth Sudduth.

NOTE: Apparently she holds a copyright on this particular design, so I have removed the instructions from this post.

You can see several different versions on HGTV here (about 13 minutes into the video), and at an origami a day.

Amanda, of House Revivals, makes them from old books.

house revivals carolina snowflake

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Extreme Cards and Papercrafting: pop up cards, movable and mechanical cards, digital crafts and unusual papercrafts.

22 comments :

Rebecca said...

Thanks to show each picture how to make snowflake, step by step. I will try to make it.

Elisabetta said...

it is so cute and delicate! thanks for the detailed tutorial
eli

Pastiche said...

Thanks for the detailed how-to for these snowflakes. Perfect mid-winter craft; I might try these with ribbon.

Crayola58 said...

Holy Cow, this Carolina Snowflake is simply fantastic. I am constantly in awe with your wonderful endeavor to tackle the detailed, and to share with us. Wonderful tute.
Carole

Ruthie said...

This is just stunning - incredible!

helen said...

The snowflake is really one of a kind and thank you for the tutorial.

Jenann said...

This is incredible!! I can't wait to try it! Thank you so much for the step-by-step instructions!

concretenprimroses said...

i've enjoyed looking at your blog.
Lots of good projects!
Kathy
ps I've just started using a craft robo to make signs at work, but I'm excited about the other possibilities.

Ksenia said...

Looks amaizing!

MariLynn said...

Wow!! Another one of your fabulous creations. I am going to have to give this a try. Thanks so much for sharing. Your directions make it look so easy!!

Tobi said...

This papercraft looks amazing!!! I tried it myself, and thanks to your easy to follow instructions and pictures, I was able to! I just recently found your blog, and I'm loving it!! I will definitely be coming back!

Kyra said...

Awesome looking snowflake! I will definitely try it myself! I love your blog! Congratulations!

Nana Donna said...

OMG these are amazing, I cant wait to try one
Nana Donnan

Jamie B. said...

oh my gosh... what beautiful snow flake!!

carine said...

Thank you so much for sharing this, I just love paper snowflakes and this one is beyond cuteness!

House Revivals said...

This is so beautiful! I love that you did a different variation on the points, by crossing the strips. That is very pretty. I'm loving the sheet music!
~Amanda

Inna (Crafts, Kids, Quilling) said...

Very beautiful snowflake! Thanks for sharing this tutorial!

Debbie M said...

OMG!! This is beautiful!!! You AMAZE me with your creativity!!!

Debbie M

Marina said...

This is great! Thanks for the tutorial.

Anonymous said...

I have to say that this is NOT a "Carolina Snowflake". (Despite what you've been told.)

This "snowflake" is in fact a traditional Finnish Star. My family is from Finland, so I do know of it. (Plus if you google: "Finnish Star" under images, you'll find MANY creations of this same design.

Just saying... it's important to give credit where credit is due.

Carol said...

Heck, and I'm Finnish, too :)!

It's rather funny, actually, if you think of it: Finnish paper stars inspire basket makers to make the stars from reed; basket stars inspire me to make one from paper. Full circle!

Penny Marble said...

While there is a retail product called the Carolina Snowflake of the same design - it was not created by Ms. Sudduth. The instructions for these ornaments date back to the 1880s and originated in Germany. They traveled to Sweden where they were known as adventsstjarnor, or advent stars - and eventually made their way to Finland. While the design is known in Finland - they are only called "Finnish Stars" here in the states. The instructions for these stars were published in the December 1973 edition of Sunset Magazine - well before any copyright claims were made.